Bell Labs

Bell Sound Division

Bell Sound Systems RT-65 tape recorder Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording

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© 2018 Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording   •   Webmaster • All pictures and content on this web site are the property of the Museum of  Magnetic Sound Recording / reel2reeltexas.com • Photos of items in our collection are available for sale. We do NOT provide copies of ads, nor photos from other sources! All photo work is billed at studio rates and a deposit is required.

Manufacturer Profiles

This is a list of information we have gathered from a variety of sources on some of the major analog reel to reel tape recorder and related equipment manufacturers.  While we have strived to provide the best information available to us, there will be corrections and additions. We include personal stories about the companies when they are provided to us.  We always invite input on corrections and updates. Thank you!

News coverage #1  News coverage #2  • mobile videomore info

The Vintage DVD set is not currently available. The entire 7 hour production is downloadable for $9.95 at this link.

view trailer of the 7 hour collection

Go to: • 3MAEG/MagnetophonAkaiAltecAmplifier CorpAmpexAmproAstaticAstrocom/MarluxBang & OlufsenlBell & HowellBell LabsBerlant ConcertoneBeyerdynamicBrüel & KjærBrenellBrushCetec GaussConcordCraigCrown • DenonDokorderDualEdisonEicoElectro SoundElectro VoiceEMI/GramophoneFerrographFostexFreemanGrundigHeathKitITCJVCKLHLeevers RichLyrecMagnecordMarantzMaxellMCIMitsubishiNagraNakamichiNeumannNewcombNeveOkiOtariPentronPhilipsPioneerPrestoRadio Shack/RealisticRangertoneRCAReeves Soundcraft • RobertsRolaSansuiScullySennheiserShureSolid State LogicSonySoundcraftSpectoneStancil HoffmanStellavoxStephensStuder ReVoxTandbergTape-AthonTapesonicTeac/TascamTechnicsTelefunkenTolnai ToshibaUher VikingVortexion Ltd UKWebster Chicago/WebcorWebster ElectricWestern Electric/AltecWilcox-GayWollensak

View calendar which lists company creation dates associated with world and recording history

 

Bell Labs and Bell Sound Division Thompson Ramo Wooldridge, Inc. are not associated.

Bell Sound Division was part of TRW originated in 1901 with the Cleveland Cap Screw Company, founded by David Kurtz and four other Cleveland residents.

It lasted more than a century until being acquired by Northrop Grumman in 2002.

In 1880, when the French government awarded Alexander Graham Bell the Volta Prize of 50,000 francs (approximately US$10,000 at that time; about $270,000 in January 2019's dollars) for the invention of the telephone, he used the award to fund the Volta Laboratory (Alexander Graham Bell Laboratory) in Washington, D.C. in collaboration with Sumner Tainter and Bell's cousin Chichester Bell. The laboratory was variously known as the Volta Bureau, the Bell Carriage House, the Bell Laboratory and the Volta Laboratory.

It focused on the analysis, recording, and transmission of sound. Bell used his considerable profits from the laboratory for further research and education to permit the "[increased] diffusion of knowledge relating to the deaf" resulting in the founding of the Volta Bureau (c. 1887) which was located at Bell's father's house at 1527 35th Street N.W. in Washington, D.C. Its carriage house became their headquarters in 1889.

In 1893, Bell constructed a new building close by at 1537 35th Street N.W., specifically to house the lab.This building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1972.

After the invention of the telephone, Bell maintained a relatively distant role with the Bell System as a whole, but continued to pursue his own personal research interests.

(left) Bell's 1893 Volta Bureau building in Washington, D.C.AlexanderGrahamBellfamily

The Bell Patent Association was formed by Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Sanders, and Gardiner Hubbard when filing the first patents for the telephone in 1876.

Bell Telephone Company, the first telephone company, was formed a year later. It later became a part of the American Bell Telephone Company.

American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T) and its own subsidiary company, took control of American Bell and the Bell System by 1889.

American Bell held a controlling interest in Western Electric (which was the manufacturing arm of the business) whereas AT&T was doing research into the service providers.

In 1884, the American Bell Telephone Company created the Mechanical Department from the Electrical and Patent Department formed a year earlier.

Bell Sound Systems RT-75 tape recorder Museum of Magnetic Sound RecordingFormal organization and location changes

In 1896, Western Electric bought property at 463 West Street to station their manufacturers and engineers who had been supplying AT&T with their product. This included everything from telephones, telephone exchange switches, and transmission equipment.

 


Bell Sound Systems RT-65 tape recorder Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording

See also Western Electric and AES


On January 1, 1925, Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc. was organized to consolidate the development and research activities in the communication field and allied sciences for the Bell System. Ownership was evenly shared between Western Electric and AT&T. The new company had existing personnel of 3600 engineers, scientists, and support staff. In addition to the existing research facilities of 400,000 square feet of space, its space was extended with a new building on about one quarter of a city block.

The first chairman of the board of directors was John J. Carty, the vice-president of AT&T, and the first president was Frank B. Jewett also a board member, who stayed there until 1940. The operations were directed by E. B. Craft, executive vice-president, and formerly chief engineer at Western Electric.

By the early 1940s, Bell Labs engineers and scientists had begun to move to other locations away from the congestion and environmental distractions of New York City, and in 1967 Bell Laboratories headquarters was officially relocated to Murray Hill, New Jersey.

The largest grouping of people in the company was in Illinois, at Naperville-Lisle, in the Chicago area, which had the largest concentration of employees (about 11,000) prior to 2001. There also were groups of employees in Indianapolis, Indiana; Columbus, Ohio; North Andover, Massachusetts; Allentown, Pennsylvania; Reading, Pennsylvania; and Breinigsville, Pennsylvania; Burlington, North Carolina (1950s–1970s, moved to Greensboro 1980s) and Westminster, Colorado. Since 2001, many of the former locations have been scaled down or closed.

The Holmdel site, a 1.9 million square foot structure set on 473 acres, was closed in 2007. The mirrored-glass building was designed by Eero Saarinen. In August 2013, Somerset Development bought the building, intending to redevelop it into a mixed commercial and residential project. A 2012 article expressed doubt on the success of the newly named Bell Works site, but several large tenants had announced plans to move in through 2016 and 2017


Suppressing Innovation: Bell Laboratories and Magnetic Recording

Clark, Mark. “SuppresClark, Mark. “Suppressing Innovation: Bell Laboratories and Magnetic Recording.” Technology and Culture, vol. 34, no. 3, 1993, pp. 516–538. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3106703. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.sing Innovation: Bell Laboratories and Magnetic Recording.” Technology and Culture, vol. 34, no. 3, 1993, pp. 516–538. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3106703. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.


Bell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder owner's manual in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionBell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder duplicating threading shown in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionBell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder duplicating threading shown in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionBell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder duplicating threading shown in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionBell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder duplicating threading shown in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Bell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder duplicating threading shown in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Bell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder duplicating threading shown in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionBell Sound Systems RT-360 tape recorder duplicating threading shown in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection 

Bell RT-65 Photofact cover in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1952 ad for the Bell Record-O-Phone reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' vintage tape recording collection1955 Bell RT-65 adin the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection1955 Bell RT-65 adin the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection 1956 ad for Bell BT-76  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection 1956 ad for the Bell RT-75 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' vintage tape recording collection  1956 ad for the Bell RT-75 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' vintage tape recording collection 

1956 ad for the Bell RT-75 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' vintage tape recording collection1956 review of  the Bell RT-75 reel to reel tape recorder in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for the Bell RT-75 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' vintage tape recording collection  1956 ad for Berlant Concertone reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection   

1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection   1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection 1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection   1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection 1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection  1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection   1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection 1956 ad for Bell  reel to reel tape recorders in Reel2ReelTexas.com's vintage recording collection


The non-profit Museum was dissolved on December 31, 2017. Donations are NOT ta x deductible and are now processed by Phantom Productions.

All donations to MOMSR go 100% to support restoration of vintage magnetic recording devices in the private collection and help fund the web site development and hosting.

 

Go to: • 3MAEG/MagnetophonAkaiAltecAmplifier CorpAmpexAmproAstaticAstrocom/MarluxBang & OlufsenlBell & HowellBell LabsBerlant ConcertoneBeyerdynamicBrüel & KjærBrenellBrushCetec GaussConcordCraigCrown • DenonDokorderDualEdisonEicoElectro SoundElectro VoiceEMI/GramophoneFerrographFostexFreemanGrundigHeathKitITCJVCKLHLeevers RichLyrecMagnecordMarantzMaxellMCIMitsubishiNagraNakamichiNeumannNewcombNeveOkiOtariPentronPhilipsPioneerPrestoRadio Shack/RealisticRangertoneRCAReeves Soundcraft • RobertsRolaSansuiScullySennheiserShureSolid State LogicSonySoundcraftSpectoneStancil HoffmanStellavoxStephensStuder ReVoxTandbergTape-AthonTapesonicTeac/TascamTechnicsTelefunkenTolnai ToshibaUher VikingVortexion Ltd UKWebster Chicago/WebcorWebster ElectricWestern Electric/AltecWilcox-GayWollensa

Tour our collection! 

We offer seven hours of 50 video segments via download about our collection and the history of magnetic recording available at this link.

ORDER THE VIDEO FILES ON LINE - was 14.95  NOW only $9.95

There are 50 QuickTime H264 854 X 480 files in this download.  Play on MAC OS or Windows Media Player

We provide 48 hours during which to download the files. After that the file access will expire.  Once the files are downloaded they are yours to keep.

© 2018 Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording  •  Webmaster • All pictures and content on this web site are the property of the Theophilus family,the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording and reel2reeltexas.com • Photos of items in our collection are available for sale. We do NOT provide copies of ads, nor photos from other sources! All photo work is billed at studio rates and a deposit is required.