Logo of the Museum of Magnetic Sound recording - preserving recording history

 

TEAC corporation • Tascam

Part 1 of 4

reel to reel tape recorders

Teac Tascam 80-8 8 track reel to reel tape recorderin the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording
(Go to our Twitter page
Bookmark and Share

PLEASE NOTE: None of the Vintage Museum items are for sale.


Manufacturer Profiles

This is a list of information we have gathered from a variety of sources on some of the major analog reel to reel tape recorder and related equipment manufacturers. While we have strived to provide the best information available to us, there will be corrections and additions. We include personal stories about the companies when they are provided to us.  We always invite input on corrections and updates. Thank you!

Statistics 20142015  •  News coverage #1  News coverage #2  • view overview video of tape recorder collectionmobile videomore info • See also Multi-Track recording

Go to: • 3MAEG/MagnetophonAkaiAltecAmplifier CorpAmpexAmproAstaticAstrocom/MarluxBang & OlufsenBellBell & HowellBell LabsBerlant ConcertoneBeyerdynamicBrüel & KjærBrenellBrushCetec GaussConcordCraigCrown • DenonDokorderDualEdisonEicoElectro SoundElectro VoiceEMI/GramophoneFerrographFostexFreemanGrundigHeathKitITCJVCKLHLeevers RichLyrecMagnecordMarantzMCIMitsubishiNagraNakamichiNeumannNewcombNeveOkiOtariPentronPhilipsPioneerPrestoRadio Shack/RealisticRangertoneRCARobertsRolaSansuiScullyShureSolid State LogicSonySoundcraftSpectoneStancil HoffmanStellavoxStephensStuder ReVoxTandbergTape-AthonTapesonicTeac/TascamTechnicsTelefunkenTolnai ToshibaUher VikingWebster Chicago/WebcorWebster ElectricWestern Electric/AltecWilcox-GayWollensak

View calendar which lists company creation dates associated with world and recording history

 

Teac Tascam Part 1 of 3 • Go to Part 2 • Go to Part 3 • Go to Part 4

Teac


Teac logo in the Museum of MAgnetic Sound Recording

Katsuma Tani one of the founders of teac TEAC corporation was founded in August 1953 (In this year, NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Corporation started television broadcasts in Japan). Factory was set up in Musashino City, Tokyo for the manufacture and sale of semi-professional audio components for recording and playback along with general electrical appliances.  Originally named the Tokyo Television Acoustic Company it employed Katsuma Tani (left), a former aviation and aeronautics engineer where he established a reputation as a highly qualified creator of audio equipment.  Known as the "King of Sound Technology" he had developed the first photo disc cutting system.

In 1956 his brother, Tomoma Tani, brought home a hand made 3-motor, 3 head stereo tape recorder. This sparked Katsuma's interest in reel-to-reel tape recorders. Confident they could engineer a better tape recorder the Tani brothers founded the Tokyo Electro-Acoustic Company on December 24th, 1956.  The name was later changed to TEAC. The factory was set up in Chitose-cho, Sumida Ward, Tokyo for the production of audio components, measurement and optical equipment and tape recorders.

 TEAC's goal was to be a leader in magnetic recording technology. In these early years when "hi-fi" was not a well known word, Tokyo Electro Acoustic Company developed a prototype of 3-motor open-reel tape transport system. In subsequent years TEAC introduced the world's first open-reel tape deck which had an automatic reverse mechanism. With this innovative product made in Japan the Tape-based hi-fi audio has begun.


 

Teac Berlant Concertone connection

More: In the February, 1982 issue of Modern Recording and Music magazine, James Rayton with the Ascot Recording Studio in Hollywood, CA wrote:

"probably around the early '60s, the (Berlant/Concertone) assembly was moved to Japan, and around the same time, I believe, the company became known, paradoxically, as "American Concertone"; their product emphasis gradually moved into the mid-to-high-end consumer category, (and occasionally appeared under other trade names like 'Concord'). Whatever remains of the company today is perhaps better known as TEAC, who interestingly, continued making the old Concertone 90 at least through the late '60s, with only a change of nameplate (and probably solid-state electronics) and a different model number."

Also from on line comments (not verified) "Some history, Bert Berlant and his cronies founded Berlant/Concertone. Later on, Bert Berlant retired and the other partner continued the company. He elected to use Concertone electronics on the early machines but use Teac transports. Later on to the end of the company, American Concertone engineered various recorders. Berlant/Concertone decks to the early American Concertone decks with Teac transports, Semi Pro! Last American Concertones, Consumer decks".(tapeheads.net)

On line forum comments (not verified) "Most of the Berlant Concertone machines were mono. Berlant Concertone tape recorders were really semi-pro decks. Beloved of dilettantes in the day. The original ones were entirely made by Berlant in the USA. The middle period used Berlant electronics (USA made) and Teac transports made in Japan. The last of the Concertones were made in Japan by various vendors. Teac didn't officially import their decks here until 1967 (also ReVox's first year sold in the USA). All of these machines are difficult to obtain spare parts for. The early and middle period decks are usually decent performers.

Those were made by TEAC about the time Berlant sold out to TEAC and was renamed American Concertone (ironic name change). It was also sold as the TEAC 507/508. 507 is the stereo version and 508 the mono version. I have one each of the TEAC and Concertone versions". unknown source

You can see the Concertone 90 and Teac's early R310 were based on the same platforms.


The following information was published by the Teac Corporation in 2015.

TEAC Corporation was originally founded as Tokyo Television Acoustic Company on August 8th, 1953 by two brothers, Katsuma and Tomoma Tani. In 1956 the two brothers founded Tokyo Electronic Acoustic Company, finally merging those firms in 1964 to form today’s TEAC Corporation.

TEAC’s very first original production model, the TD-102, went on sale in April 1957. And here’s the story behind it:

In 1957, two Americans came to visit the newly established Tokyo Electronic Acoustic Company. They were the CEO and the chief engineer of a big radio manufacturer called Lafayette Radio Electronics. When Tani showed them the prototype for the TD-102, they said “Add a playback amp, turn it into a tape player and change the casing to a cabinet and we’ll take it!”. And with that, they ordered 25 units. While happy to receive such a great bulk order, there wasn’t anyone at the company at the time to configure the amps… So according to legend, staff had to work flat out for 72 hours straight to complete the order in time. But their hard work paid off: The TD-102 crossed over into the American market and quickly became a favorite amongst audio fans. (Picture showing TEAC’s founder, Katsuma Tani, with the TD-102)

 The original Teac TD-102 reel to reel tape recorder built by Teac Japan in 1957. Our Museum has one of the oiginal in its original crate.  The original Teac TD-102 reel to reel tape recorder built by Teac Japan in 1957. Our Museum has one of the oiginal in its original crate.   The original Teac TD-102 reel to reel tape recorder built by Teac Japan in 1957. Our Museum has one of the oiginal in its original crate.  The original Teac TD-102 reel to reel tape recorder built by Teac Japan in 1957. Our Museum has one of the oiginal in its original crate.

Photos used with permission from Teac Corporation, Japan.

However, even after that first big order from Lafayette, few new orders came through. At the time, the extremely high price of a TD-102 (60,000 Yen in a time when the starting salary of a graduate bank clerk was 15,000 Yen) coupled with the fact that vinyl records were the standard of the day – meant that TEAC was slightly too far ahead of the curve that would one day see tape as the default playback and recording format.

But nevertheless, this was not the end of the story around our TD-102… More to come - Teac Japan

translated Teac Japan posting of information about the Teac 4010S selling 200,000 units in our vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   translated Teac Japan posting of information about the Teac 4010S selling 200,000 units in our vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac 4010S selling 200,000 units in our vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac 4010S selling 200,000 units in our vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  translated Teac Japan posting of information about the Teac 4010S selling 200,000 units in our vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

(right) translated Teac Japan posting of information about the Teac 4010S selling 200,000 units


2017 Teac Brochure 
2020 Teac History Timeline

 

 


Teac 25th Anniversary box released in 1982 and showing the Teac TD-102 reel tape recorder both of which are in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

Teac TD-301 reel tape recorder shown with the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionThis Teac TD-301 recorder was almost identical in design to the Ampex 300 (left photo - top recorder) released in 1949. The Anniversary box and the Teac TD-301 tape recorder in its original wood box are both in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.

Teac TD-301 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Teac TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

Teac TD-301 reel tape recorder - new in original shipping box from Japan


One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection. Note the refrigerator handle.  One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.   One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.   One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.     One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.   One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.  One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.   One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.   One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.   One of the early Teac reel to rel tape recorders modeled after the Ampex 300 professional reel tape recorder.  This is the Chicago Sound Masters TD-102 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection.

The Museum also has a working Teac TD-102 that came from Chicago Sound Masters company.  It is a bit older deck than the one above and has the original Teac preamps. The recorder was built into a wood box with an old refrigerator handle on top and a fan built into the bottom right corner for additional cooling.  The recorder and its box have numerous labels stating the unit belongs to Sound Masters (even the refrigerator handle).  Looks to have been a recorder that was on the go.

Teac TD-105 reel to reel tape recorder photo in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   Inside the Teac TD-105 reel to reel tape recorder photo in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection 

Teac TD-105 reel to reel tape recorder

Teac TD-105D/TD-7520/Series R-110  and R-114 - 1959 with Teac  AR-9C & 9D Amps Manual pdf  •  This recorder was donated to the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording by Penny Hendrix - "It was acquired in Japan between 1960 and 1963 by my father."

1959 Teac TD-7520, RC-11, TD-105 professional 3 motor reel to reel tape recorder in the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording 1959 Teac TD-7520, RC-11, TD-105 professional 3 motor reel to reel tape recorder in the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording    1959 Teac TD-7520, RC-11, TD-105 professional 3 motor reel to reel tape recorder in the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording  1959 Teac TD-7520, RC-11, TD-105 professional 3 motor reel to reel tape recorder in the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording   1959 Teac TD-7520, RC-11, TD-105 professional 3 motor reel to reel tape recorder in the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording 

TEAC/Concertone

Teac's relationship with the American Berlant Concertone reel tape recorder company led to Teac building components for several different reel to reel tape recorder manufacturers

Berlant professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Museum of magnetic Sound RecordingIt probably seems unusual to begin this segment on Teac mentioning the Berlant Concertone recorder. Emmanuel "Bert" Berlant began manufacturing the Berlant reel to reel tape recorders in the late 1940's. Later his company Berlant and Associates introduced the Concertone line. His partners continued the company when Berlant left in 1956. Interestingly, that same year 2 brothers in Japan Tomoma & Katsuma Tani had The Teac 505 and Concertone 505 reel tape recorders in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionacquired a homemade 3 motor, 3 head stereo tape recorder and decided they could build a higher quality product. On August 8, 1953, the brothers formed the Tokyo Electro-Acoustic Company (TEAC) and began producing their early reel to reel tape recorders. In June 1959 the Tokyo Television Acoustic Co. and Tokyo Electro-Acoustic Co. join forces to manufacture tape recorders.

Sometime between 1957 and 1960, Berlant and Associates began buying Teac tape transports for their Concertone line of recorders. By 1960, the Concertone recorder assembly was moved to the Teac plant in Japan. The first time we saw an ad for American Concertone was in this 1959 ad for the Model 60, 63K and 68 (below).1959 ad for the Teac/Concertone 60, 63K and 68 reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

The only mention of this move was found in the February, 1982 issue of Modern Recording and Music magazine. James Rayton with the Ascot Recording Studio in Hollywood, CA wrote:  "probably around the early '60s, the (Berlant/Concertone) assembly was moved to Japan, and around the same time, I believe, the company became known, paradoxically, as "American Concertone"; their product emphasis gradually moved into the mid-to-high-end consumer category, (and occasionally appeared under other trade names like 'Concord'). Whatever remains of the company today is perhaps better known as TEAC, who interestingly, continued making the old Concertone 90 at least through the late '60s, with only a change of nameplate (and probably solid-state electronics) and a different model number."

I believe the American Concertone 60 series (Concertone Electronics and Teac transports) evolved into the Concertone 505K, seen in this 1961 ad (right) with the model TR-100. The specs and design of the Concertone 505K and the Teac 505 are identical.

  The earliest Teac reel to reel tape recorder in our collection is the 1956 Teac TD-102 reel to reel tape recorder. Next is the 1959 Teac TD-105/TD7520/R-111& R-11. In 1960 the Teac 505R reel to reel tape recorder was released. An identical unit was built by Teac and labelled with the Concertone brand, which is also labeled the 505K. We have that unit in our collection as well (above right with the Teac 505 tape recorder).

In January 1961 the Corporate headquarters moved to the present site at 1-47 Ochiai, Tama-shi, Tokyo 206-8530, Japan.

In My 1961 a licensing agreement is concluded with IBM. First production in Japan of magnetic tape memory systems.

1964 ad for the Concertone (Teac) 800 open reel tape recorder in the Museum of magnetic Sound RecordingDokorder branded Concertone (Teac) 800 reel tape recorder photo in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

 

No Teac reel tape recorders were officially imported into the States until middle to late 1965. However Concertone was selling their recorders in the US under the American Concertone brand. Interestingly here is the Concertone 800 from 1964 (left). And here is the same recorder branded under the Dokorder brand right).

Dokorder branded Concertone (Teac) 800 reel tape recorder photo in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

1966 listing of the Concord R-1100 in HiFiStereo tape recorder issue and same recorder released as the Teac R-1200 in a 1968 ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

Teac/Concertone/Concord

Concertone, using the Japanese Teac facilities was also building Concord reel tape recorders. Here's the Concord R-1100 tape recorder listed in our 1966 Hi/Fi Stereo Tape Recorder Directory and one year later the same model being released in an ad for the Teac A-1200

 

No US Sales of Teac until 1965

Sales of Teac recorders were booming in the 1960's, however for persons in the US, they were only available to military folks through US base exchanges.  There were no Teac reel to reel tape recorders released prior to 1965.  The US government began requiring that offshore audio manufacturers to have US based service centers.

This gets interesting now because Teac continued to release reel to reel tape recorders and some may be branded only Teac and others may be Teac/Tascam or just Tascam

1966 Teac Consumer Open Reel Tape Recorder Ads

1966 Teac reel to reel tape recorder brochure  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection 1966 Teac reel to reel tape recorder brochure  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

1966 Teac reel to reel tape recorder brochure  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection 1966 Teac reel to reel tape recorder brochure  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

1966 Teac reel to reel tape recorder brochure

 

1966 Teac Professional Open Reel Tape Recorder Ads

Teac Model R-310 reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   Teac Model R-310 reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1961 ad fo the Concertone Series 90 professional reel tape recorder built for Concertone by Teac.  Ad is in the Museum of MAgnetic Sound Recording

1969

Teac Model R340 reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac Model R340 reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

1971

1971 ad for the Teac A-3300 professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 ad for the Teac A-7030SL  professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection 1971 ad for the Teac A-7030SL  professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   1971 ad for the Teac A-7030SL  professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   1971 Teac 90-16 16 track professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

  1971 Teac A-1230 ad  recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac TCA-40 series  recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac TCA-40 series  recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac TCA ads for the  4 track Simil-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection1971 Teac 90-16 16 track professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   1971 Teac recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

  1971 Teac dolby support  units for recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac dolby support  units for recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac dolby support  units for recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac dolby support  units for recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac dolby support  units for recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1971 Teac dolby support  units for recorders reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Tascam  Tascam logo in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

Around the middle to late 1965, according to the Tascam book, 30 Years of Recording Evolution, the US government required electronic imports to set up US based service facilities. The one set up for TEAC was located in Santa Monica, CA and named TCA for Teac Corporation of America. Here they began retrofitting the Japanese stereo and quad decks for multitrack and Simul-Sync recording.

In the late 1960's, the Tani brothers and Dr. Abe Yoshiharu, a senior engineer at TEAC, formed a special R&D group named TASC (TEAC Audio Systems Corp.) for the purpose of researching ways to apply TEAC's recording technology for musicians and recording studios. TASCAM (TASC America Corp.) was established in 1971 for the purpose of distributing TASC products in the U.S. and conducting additional market research. The company's first home was at 5440 McConnell Avenue, on the west side of Los Angeles near Marina del Rey.

 Yoshiharu Abe is known as the father of personal multi-track recording in the audio engineering field.  He was one of the five founders of TEAC in 1957 and went on to become one of the company’s most important product designers.  Dr. Yoshiharu Abe (03/31/1931  01/02/2013) - is known as the father of personal multi-track recording in the audio engineering field. He was one of the five founders of TEAC in 1957 and went on to become one of the company’s most important product designers.

In the may 30, 1970 Billboard, Teac said they were the largest manufacturer of 3 motor reel tape decks, turning out 9,00Teac 4010 reel tape recorder in the Museum of MAgnetic Sound Recording0 units per month.

During the formative years in the early '70s, the music scene was flourishing. Musicians who wanted to showcase their talents and abilities to the recording industry needed a cost effective means to record their music. However, most musicians could afford neither the expense of recording in a professional recording studio nor the asking price of professional recording equipment. Realizing the dilemma facing these musicians, TASC adopted a philosophy of manufacturing recording equipment that offered the uncompromising quality and durability of professional studio equipment while remaining affordable to the masses.

The early TASC multitrack products were sold under the TEAC brand name. In 1974 TASCAM was absorbed by the rapidly growing TEAC Corp. of America sales and distribution company, and TASCAM became the official brand name of all TEAC recording products designed specifically for musicians and recording studios.

1971 TASCAM (TASC America) created by Teac Audio Systems Corporation (TASC) of Tokyo and headed by Dr. Yoshiharu Abe and a small team of techs and marketing pros. The group began by converting Teac 4010 (right) recorders to the over-dub capable Simul-Sync 4 trackTCA-40 series.

Don Felder with the Eagles constructed the basic elements of Hotel California on a Teac 4 track.

TASCAM, the company that invented the home studio revolution, is one of four divisions of TEAC Corporation, a $1.2 billion manufacturing company headquartered in Japan. While the other divisions of TEAC have grown into a multitude of high tech industries including data storage devices, consumer electronics tools and industrial products, TASCAM has remained dedicated to making innovative products for capturing creativity in the field of music and audio.


The following was sourced from the Tascam Teac Corporate web site in 2015

For more than 30 years, TASCAM has developed products for every segment of the sound and music industry. From the high-end audio professional in a major post-production studio to the novice or hobbyist at home, TASCAM is everywhere. We are a company committed to providing our customers audio/video solutions that enable breakthroughs by using sound in ways that are as exciting as they are accessible. In short, we provide tools that let people translate their creativity into reality.

After virtually creating the home recording scene during the early 1970s, TASCAM went on to achieve recognition for pioneering products in the professional recording arena as well. Our legacy of product development and innovation is reflected in the sheer number of industry firsts we've achieved, including:
the first 1/2-inch, 4-track cassette recorder
the first 8-track, reel-to-reel/mixer combo
the first R-DAT recorder
the first MiniDisc digital multitracker and CD scratcher

As evidenced by the awards and professional recognition we've received, TASCAM products are clearly in a class by themselves. Our MMR-8 digital audio dubber for the motion picture industry won an Oscar® at the Scientific and Technical Academy Awards in 2001 - based largely on its contribution to the Dolby Surround EX final mix for "The Lord of the Rings." TASCAM also won Emmy Awards in 1995 (for Outstanding Achievement in Engineering Development for the TASCAM DA-88 Digital Multitrack Recorder) and 2000 (for Outstanding Achievement in Engineering Development for the MMR-8 and MMP-16).

Company History

TASCAM is one of four divisions of TEAC Corporation, a $1.2 billion manufacturing company headquartered in Japan. Since its founding in 1953, other divisions of TEAC have evolved into high-tech leaders in data storage devices, consumer electronics tools and industrial products, but TASCAM has remained dedicated to making innovative products for capturing creativity in the field of music and audio.

During the formative years in the early '70s, the music scene was flourishing. Musicians who wanted to showcase their talents and abilities to the recording industry needed a cost effective means to record their music. However, most musicians could afford neither the expense of recording in a professional recording studio nor the asking price of professional recording equipment. Realizing the dilemma facing these musicians, TASCAM adopted a philosophy of manufacturing recording equipment that offered the uncompromising quality and durability of professional studio equipment while remaining affordable to the masses.


 

In the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording we have the original unit that was turned into a Simul-Sync recorder.  It first was released as the TCA-40, TCA-41, then the TCA-42 and finally in the Simul-Sync version with the Simul-Sync switches built into the head cover. The Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording has the Teac TCA-43 Simul-Sync reel tape recorder in our collection.

 

Teac TCA-43 4 track Simil-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1972 ad Teac TCA-43 4 track Simil-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

This is the Teac TCA-43 in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

The Advent of the Multi-Track

Simul-Sync: the ability to record on one track while listening to another, and the basis for all modern overdubbing technologies.

1972   The first mass-produced 4 channel tape recorders with Simul-Sync, the Teac A-3340S and the Teac A-2340S, are shipped .  Teac also releases many other models

1972 brochure covering the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection  Manual cover for the  Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection1972 brochure covering the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection  1972 brochure covering the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection 1972 brochure covering the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection 1972 brochure covering the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection  1972 brochure covering the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection  1972 ad for  the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection

1973   The first TASCAM branded products are introduced at the AES (Audio Engineering Society) show held in New York at the Waldorf Astoria. The models introduced are the M-10 mixer, Series 70H-X MTR, Series 70H-8 MTR.

1975 review of the Teac A-6100 2 track simul-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionOn March 4th, TEAC Corporation of America's eleven directors sign closing documents merging the TASCAM Corporation into TCA (TEAC Corporation of America). TEAC-Japan obtains the exclusive worldwide rights to the TASCAM brand name. The first TASCAM branded products (M-10 mixers) are shipped to dealers. Ad for the Teac A-3340 4 track simul-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

In order to get a clear the advent of multitrack recording with regards to TASCAM, we must first begin our journey prior to 1974 with the introduction of products manufactured under the TEAC brand name. These products were:

(1) The TEAC A-3340 was built specifically as a quadraphonic recorder. However, musicians were instantly attracted to the A3340because of its low price and ability to record four tracks. This was fortunate for TEAC, as quadraphonic playback never caught on to the degree the consumer audio industry pundits had predicted. Dr. Abe and several TEAC employees in the United States quickly grasped the incredible potential of the A3340 as a multitrack recorder, and developed the Simul-Sync technology for the A3340S. This technology enabled the record head to also act as a play head, thus eliminating the delay time between playback and recorded tracks which occurred when record and play heads were physically separated.

1972 ad for the Teac A-3340 4 track simul-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionEven though the TEAC A-3340S was not originally intended for use in a professional environment, its versatility and performance made it a huge success and cemented demand for this affordable multitrack technology. This model was the foundation upon which TASCAM's multitrack business was built.

(2) The TEAC A-6100 (a 1/4 inch 2 track reel-to-reel mastering tape recorder with Simul-Sync). One of the key features of the TEAC A-6100 wasAd for the Teac A-3340 4 track simul-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionits rugged and durable transport. This product was significant as it was to become the basis for the very successful TASCAM 80-8 recorder.

(3) The TEAC Model 2 audio mixer featured six pan pots and four full size VU meters.

1972 ad for the Teac A-2340 4 track simul-Sync reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection(4) The TEAC A-2340S (a 1/4 inch 4 track multitrack reel-to-reel tape recorder with Simul-Sync with 7 inch reels). The A-2340S was simply a less expensive version of the A-3340S.

Several other smaller companies were manufacturing similar types of products, but TEAC was the only company that could design, manufacture and maintain quality of these types of products at a price considerably less than the "pro" studio products.

The original Teac A-2340 and A-3340 had chrome knob covers and in the later upgraded Teac A-2340 and A-3340 reel tape recorder versions, the knobs were all black.

Video video of Highland Sound/Phantom Productions, Inc.'s on-location setup with the Teac A-3340

Teac Series 50 T-3413 A left photo contributed by Dirk van Tamelen Tascam Series 50 brochure in the Reel2ReelTexas-MOMSR-Theophilus vintage reel 2o reel tape recorder collection

We were not aware of this model Teac reel tape recorder (left). It's serial number is "01" which indicates it may have been a prototype. It was most likely the beginning of the Series 70 reel taperecorders. Hre's another similar mode (right) l, the TeacT-3680/M4 that was released as a four track.

"Had in possession since young electronics tech now over 40 Yes now. 1/4" 1/2 track with positive large rubberized factory knobs assuming for mastering (didn't know it or about the XLR rear connections at the time of acquisition as an 18yr old ). All worked great then and still does.

Purchased from a commercial electronics parts wholesale reseller with est 3kft warehouse of overstock of many off shoot electronics parts including a chance Teac/Tascam RTR preamps and etc. Located in Westlake Village, Ca USA circa @1976  On Agoura Road. Store owner was Irv Finkel and his wife who tended the shop.  Rather a quirky but loveable married couple running a dingy warehouse of spare random components.. but this unit stood out even back then.

Much thanks ! Dirk from US. "

Teac Series 50 T-3413A Serial 01 photos donated by Dirk van Tamelen   Teac Series 50 T-3413A Serial 01 photos donated by Dirk van Tamelen   Teac Series 50 T-3413A Serial 01 photos donated by Dirk van Tamelen   Teac Series 50 T-3413A Serial 01 photos donated by Dirk van Tamelen

"Ps. After finding and thinking on your website and what brought you to such dedication....
On a personal note of interest regarding magnetic recording, for some unknown reason as a young teenager, our family received a boxed Panasonic reel to reel full sized deck, sent to US from my older Vietnam army brother Chris van Tamelen.   It was mesmerizing. As a mechanical and functional audio device. Most every day, after grade school would spend hours spending face time with the unit in the living room. Recording, Stopping. Playing back. Anything. Made so much technical sense.... At the time as playing guitar and piano since a 5 yr old.

Believe it ultimately directed an entire future.   Thank you for your reverence to this medium.

Dirk van Tamelen (California)"

THE FIRST TASCAM PRODUCTS

The Series 70 8 track professional reel tape recorder (below) in the Museum of Magnetic Sound RecordingTeac Series 70H8 8 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

1974 - The first TASC Series 70 reel-to-reel recorders were shipped to dealers in the United States. Originally manufactured Teac Series 70H8 8 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionin Japan under the brand name TASC, the recorders were re branded under the TASCAM name. (The transport for the Series 70 recorders were based on TEAC's A-7030 transport.) There were four 70 series products:

1) 2 track, 1/4 inch master recorder
2) 4 track 1/4 inch reel-to-reel
3) 4 track 1/2 inch reel-to-reel
4) 8 track 1/2 inch reel-to-reel

Introduction of the first TASCAM mixing console, the Model 10, which offered features found in far more expensive mixers. One unique feature of the Model10 (8x4) mixer was that it was designed to be expandable. Featuring a Quad panner, used for Quadraphonic mixing and priced at a very affordable $2,350.00, the Model 10 would change the way the industry would view mixing consoles forever. Its functionality and price point drew the attention of musicians, television post professionals and die-hard audiophiles overnight. The Model 10 became the basis for the Model 5 mixing system.

 

Warehouse Sound listing of the Teac Series 70H8 8 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection1975 ad for the Teac Series 70H8 8 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1975 ad for the Teac Series 70H8 8 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionSpecifications for the Teac Series 70H8 8 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

TASCAM relocated its headquarters to 7733 Telegraph Road, Montebello (Los Angeles), California, where it remains to this day.

1975  In September, the long awaited TASCAM series Model 5 mixer (8x4x4), was shipped in limited quantities to excited dealers across the United States. Teac Tascam Model 5 mixer ad in the Museum of magnetic Sound RecordingThe Model 5 had all the features of the Model 10. Its success in the marketplace was attributed to the fact that it was quieter, considerably less expensive than the Model 10, and was designed to give musicians the same precise control over their sound during a live performance as they had in a controlled recording environment. (List price $1,500.00)

TASCAM ran its first full-page advertisement in November's issue of Rolling Stone Magazine. The advertising message targeted small studio business owners.

In November, TASCAM changed its calibration tape for all TASCAM 70 Series recorders from Scotch 250 to AMPEX 456 Grand Master.

Although short lived, the Series 70 was the first 1/2" multitrack in existence. It paved the way for the 80-8. Introduced into them ark et place in January

Sometime between the Series 70 and the 80-8, Teac Tascam released a Tascam Series 80 (below) professional reel to reel tape recorder which was similar to the Series 70.

  Tascam Series 80 professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Museum of magnetic Sound RecordingSpecifications for the Tascam Series 80 professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Museum of magnetic Sound Recording   Teac F-1  professional reel to reel tape recorder ad in the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording Tascam Series 80 brochure in the Reel2ReelTexas-MOMSR-Theophilus vintage reel 2o reel tape recorder collection

  

Teac and AmpexTeac built this ATR-700 for Ampex and relesed it under their own Teac brand as the A-7300 2 track mastering tape recorder reel to reel tape recorderin the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording

Teac Tascam 80-8 8 track reel to reel tape recorderin the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording

In 1975 Teac released the A-7300 2T 2 Track mastering tape recorder with dbx.  Teac manufactured this same unit for Ampex and to Ampex specifications as the Ampex ATR-700 professional reel tape recorder. This was the first known joint manufacture of a reel tape recorder by Ampex and Teac.  Later Teac produced the last Ampex reel tape recorder which was the ATR-800.  This recorder was styled after the Ampex ATR-100 series professional reel tape recorders.

Ampex ATR-700 built by Teac and released by Teac as the A-7300 reel tape recorder. Ampex ATR-700 built by Teac and released by Teac as the A-7300 reel tape recorder.  Ampex ATR-700 built by Teac and released by Teac as the A-7300 reel tape recorder.

1975 ad for Teac reel to reel tape recorders in the Reel2ReelTexas.com and the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording   1975 ad for Teac reel to reel tape recorders in the Reel2ReelTexas.com and the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording   1975 ad for Teac reel to reel tape recorders in the Reel2ReelTexas.com and the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording

Teac also added additional reel to reel tape recorders including: the A-2300Sx, a-3300SX, the A-4300SX, the A-5300 and A-5500 tape decks

1976  the durability and performance of the 80-8 1/2" 8 track reel-to-reel tape recorder squelched any remaining myths about the viability of affordableStar wars ad for the R2D2 audio recording effects completed by the Teac Tascam 80-8 pro reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionmultitrack recording equipment. The 80-8 utilized the same transport as the TEAC A-6100 but boasted more durable motors, a better configuration of the tape path, and greater tolerance under prolonged use and stress.

Teac Tascam 80-8 8 track reel to reel tape recorderin the Museum of Magnetic Sound RecordingThe 80-8 was simple to align. Unlike the Series 70 recorders, all the adjustments could be made from the front of the recorder. Print advertising, the RIAA and Modern Recording and Mix Magazine's support of the 80-8 played a significant part in the ultimate success of this TASCAM product. Classic groups of the mid-70s like Boston and Kansas recorded hit albums using the 80-8 recorder.  The Teac/Tascam 80-8 reel tape recorder also became a star in the Star Wars film as it was used to record the audio tracks for R2D2 and 3CPO (see ads right). Below Ben Burtt discusses his work on Star Wars sound effects. Also the collection has a reel to reel tape "The Story of Star Wars - Original Cast narrated by Rosco Lee Browne. Play Part 1Part 2

      

      

The TASCAM 80-8 (left in Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording) originally sold for $3,500.00. By comparison, an Ampex 8 channel multitrack recorder sold for approximately $10,000.00 at the time.

Introduction of the Model 1 (right), TASCAM's first (8x2) line level mixer.Teac Model 1 mixer ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

Introduction of the Model 3, TASCAM's 8-In, 4-out 2 Monitor (8x4x2) first versatile and portable mixer.

 

Teac Model 1 mixer ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionTASCAM introduced the rack mountable DX-8 (8 channels of dbx noise reduction). The DX-8 significantly improved the fidelity of audio recordings. When combined with TASCAM's 80-8 multitrack recorder, the marked improvement of the audio mirrored those recordings made on multitrack recorders costing four times as much as the 80-8.

The DX-8 (dbx noise reduction module) would help TASCAM ultimately level the playing field with regards to its acceptance of a professionally recorded product on an affordable multitrack recorder.

 

 

1976 Teac open reel tape recorder  ads in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  1976 Teac open reel tape recorder  ads in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection 1976 Teac open reel tape recorder  ads in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection1976 Teac open reel tape recorder  ads in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection1976 "Home Made with Teac" album produced using the Teac A-334 o rel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

Teac released the album "Home Made with Teac" in 1976" The album was recorded using the Teac A-3340 reel tape recorder

 

1977 Teac Tascam Ad for the 40-4, DX-4 and the Model 3 mixer in the Reel2ReelTexas/Theophilus/MOMSR vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionand the 1977  The ideal combination of the 80-8 multitrack tape recorder and the Model 5 portable mixer paved the way for the introduction of the 25-2, a 2 track mastering reel-to-reel recorder far superior to the earlier TASCAM Series 70, 2-track recorders. This 25-2 was also based on the Teac A-7300 and Ampex ATR-700.  The 25-2 had what industry professionals touted as being all the right ingredients... quality, durability, aesthetics and most importantly a very reasonable price. The 40-4 was TASCAM's first professional heavy-duty production and playback 1/4" 4 track recorder.Teac Model 5 ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

1978  TASCAM introduced its most functional and professional mixer up to that point in its history, the Model 15. There were two versions: (16-in, 8-Teac Tascam 80-8 8 track reel to reel tape recorder, the Model 15 mixer and the Model 35-2 reel tape recorder  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionout) and (24-in,8-out). The Model 15 had a width of 61.5 inches, a shipping weight of almost 400 pounds and was priced at $7,500...substantially less than its nearest competitor boasting similar features. 

- The Model 5B mixer incorporated a new Integrated Circuit (IC) chip which was four times faster than the previous Model 5 and offered a cleaner sound.

 

 

1979 ad for the Teac Tascam 90-16 16 track 1" professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

 

 

1979   TASCAM unveiled the 90-16, a 1", 16-track multitrack recorder with 16 channels of dbx. This was TASCAM's first 1", 16-track recorder. Its inception paved the way for the genesis of more 16-track studios than ever before, many of which also installed the Model 15 mixers. Designed for ease of operation, the 90-16 featured one button operation which could simultaneously switch three interrelated tape functions: tape/source, playback/record and dbx decode/encode functions. At the time every other 16-track recorder was using 2" tape.


1979 also saw the introduction of a product called the TEAC 124 Syncaset. The key to its success was that its Simul-Sync feature gave musicians the ability to do sound-on-sound on a standard stereo cassette. A musician could listen to one track and overdub on the other at the same time. The 124 carried the TEAC brand name but was marketed by TASCAM's sales organization.


Teac Japan - Repair of open reel deck

At TEAC repair center, repair of open reel deck, which has already been completed, will be within the range of repair parts it possesses, but we will support as much as possible.
Please do not hesitate to contact us!    View pdf  View site


Teac Tascam Reel To Reel Tape Recorders in our MOMSR collection

Year
Model
Ad
Unit in Museum collection
Specifications
 

1956

TD-102 & AR-8s
Similar recorder marketed under the Concertone brand in the 1962 Radio Shack catalog.
Teac's first professional reel to reel tape recorder. the TD-102 in its original wooden shipping box in the Museum of magnetic sound recording
  • Freq Response
  • Signal to Noise
  • Speed 7.5 & 15 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy
  • Weight  54 lbs
  • Price $349.50

more information

No longer in our collection

A reminder that the prices listed are what the item originally sold for in the year it was released.

 

1956

TD-105 & AR-8s
1959 Teac TD-7520, RC-11, TD-105 professional 3 motor reel to reel tape recorder donated by Penny Hendrix to the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recordingund recording
1959 Teac TD-7520, RC-11, TD-105 professional 3 motor reel to reel tape recorder donated by Penny Hendrix to the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recordingund recording

 

  • Freq Response 40 - 15,000
  • Signal to Noise50db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy .5%
  • Weight  40 lbs
  • Price

more information

 

1957

TD-301
The original Teac TD-301 10" reel -  reel to reel tape recorder built by Teac Japan in 1957. Our Museum has one of the oiginal in its original crate.
Teac's first professional reel to reel tape recorder. the TD-102 in its original wooden shipping box in the Museum of magnetic sound recording

 

  • Freq Response 40 - 15,000
  • Signal to Noise50db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10"
  • Timing accuracy .5%
  • Weight  40 lbs
  • Price
  • Modeled after the Ampex 300

more information

 

1960

505
10/9/61 manual for the Teac 505-R reel to reel tape recorder  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
Teac 505  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 50 - 15,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 45 db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5  ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy  .15%
  • Weight  37 lbs
  • Price $495

more information

 
 

1966

A-2020
10/9/61 manual for the Teac 505-R reel to reel tape recorder  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
Teac 505  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • NLIC
 

1966

Teac A-4010S
Ad for the Teac A-4010GSL reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
Teac A-4010 reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 30 - 20,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 50 db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5  ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy  .12%
  • Weight  48 lbs
  • Price $450

more information

 
Year
Model
Ad
Unit in Museum collection
Specifications

1968

Teac A-2340
1972 brochure covering the Teac 2340 reel to reel tape recorder in Phantom Productions' reel tape recording collection
Teac A-2340 4 channel 1/4" reel to reel tape recorder with Simul-Sync in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 30 - 22,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 55 db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5  ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy  .08%
  • Weight  46.5 lbs
  • Price $495

more information

No longer in our collection

 

1973

Teac TCA-43
picture of Teac TCA-43
Teac TCA-43 reel tape recorder with Simul-Sync capability in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 30 - 22,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 55 db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5  ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy  .08%
  • Weight  46.5 lbs
  • Price $495

more information

 

1973

Tascam Series 70H8
1975 ad for th Teac Tascam Series 70 1/2" 8 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Series 70 in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 40 - 18,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 63 db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5 & 15 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .08%
  • Weight  108 lbs
  • Price $4,600.00

more information

 

1975

Teac A-3300-2T
1975 ad for th Teac A-3300SX-2T track professional reel to reel tape recorder ad  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam A-3300 2 Track mastering recorder in the Museum of magnetic Sound Recording

 

  • Freq Response 30 - 26,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 67 db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5 & 15 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .04%
  • Weight  45 lbs
  • Price $900.00

more information

No longer in our collection

 

1976

Teac A-4300R
1975 ad for th Teac A-3300SX-2T track professional reel to reel tape recorder ad  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum

Teac  A-4300R reel to reel tape recorder donated by the Hugh Sparks Estate to the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording

(NLIC as non-profit was dissolved12/31/17)

 

  • Freq Response 20 - 24,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 55 db
  • Speed 3.75 & 7.5
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .04%
  • Weight  64 lbs
  • Price $699.00
  • Auto-reverse

Owners manualService Manual

NLIC

 

 

1972

to 1978

Teac A-3340
1977 ad for the Teac Tascam A-3340 2 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam A-3340 Track professional  mastering recorder in the Museum of magnetic Sound Recording
  • Freq Response 30 - 20,000 cps @ 15ips
  • Signal to Noise 62 db
  • Speed 7.5 & 15ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .08%
  • Weight  50 lbs
  • Price $1,200

more information

 

1975

to 1982

Teac Tascam 80-8
1979 ad for the Teac Tascam 80-8 8 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 80-8 eight Track mastering recorder in the Museum of magnetic Sound Recording
  • Freq Response 40 - 16,000 cps @ 15
  • Signal to Noise 65 db
  • Speed  15 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .05%
  • Weight  76 lbs
  • Price $3,500.00

more information

Variable controller VS-88 manual

Variable controller - NLIC

 

1977

Teac Tascam 25-2
1979 ad for the Teac Tascam 35-2 2 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 35-2 2 Track mastering reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 30 - 28,000 cps @ 15
  • Signal to Noise 100 db w/dbx
  • Speed  7.5 & 15 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .05%
  • Weight  62 lbs
  • Price $1,850.00

more information

 

NLIC

 

1979

Teac Tascam 35-2
1979 ad for the Teac Tascam 35-2 2 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 35-2 2 Track mastering reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 40 - 22,000 cps @ 15
  • Signal to Noise 65 db
  • Speed  7.5 & 15 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .06%
  • Weight  76 lbs
  • Price $1,900.00

more information

 

1980

Teac Tascam 3440
1980 ad for the Teac Tascam A-3440 4 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 3440 - 4 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

 

  • Freq Response 25 - 24,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 65 db
  • Speed  7.5 & 15 ips
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .05%
  • Weight  55 lbs
  • Price $1,199.00

more information

No longer in our collection

 

1981

TeacX-1000R
1979 ad for the Teac X-1000R reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac X-1000R reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

 

  • Freq Response 30 - 34,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 65 db
  • Speed  3.75 7.5
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .03%
  • Weight  52 lbs
  • Price $1,400.00

more information

No longer in our collection

 

1983

TeacX-700R
1984 ad for the Teac X-700R reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum

1984  Teac X-700R reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum donated by the Hugh Sparks Estate

 

  • Freq Response 30 - 24,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 40 db
  • Speed  3.75 7.5
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy  .12%
  • Weight  40 lbs
  • Price $495.00

NLIC

 

 

 

1985

1979 ad for the Teac Tascam 35-2 2 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 388 eight track mixer and  reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

 

  • Freq Response 30 - 16,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 59 db
  • Speed  7.5
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy  .05%
  • Weight  83.6 lbs
  • Price $3,995.00

8 track on 1/4" tape self contained, dbx, pitch

more information

 

1989

Teac Tascam TRS-8
1989 ad for the Teac Tascam TRS-8 8 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 388 eight track mixer and  reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection

 

  • Freq Response 40 - 20,000 cps @ 15 ips
  • Signal to Noise 68 db
  • Speed  15
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10"
  • Timing accuracy  .06%
  • Weight  60 lbs
  • Price $3,000.00+

 

more information

NLIC

 

1991

Tascam 22-2
1991 ad for the Teac Tascam 22-2  2 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 22-2  2 track professional reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
  • Freq Response 40 - 22,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 61 db
  • Speed  7.5 & 15
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  7"
  • Timing accuracy  .07%
  • Weight  31 lbs
  • Price $1.099.00

2 track mastering deck

more information

No longer in our collection

 

1992 to 2004

Tascam BR-20T
1992 ad for the Teac Tascam BR-20T two track mastering reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection Museum
Teac Tascam 3440 - 4 track reel to reel tape recorder in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection
  • Freq Response 35 - 22,000 cps @ 7.5
  • Signal to Noise 60 db
  • Speed  7.5 & 15
  • Motors  3
  • Reels  10.5"
  • Timing accuracy  .01%
  • Weight  62 lbs
  • Price $4,000.00

2 track mastering deck specs

more information

 
 
Other Teac products in collection

Teac AN-60  Teac AN-60  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac AN-60 ad  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Teac AN-180  Teac AN-180  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   Teac AN-180  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Teac An-300 & AX-300 1972 $439.50  Teac AN-180  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionTeac An-300 & AX-300 in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac An-300 & AX-300 in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection     Teac An-300 & AX-300 in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collectionNLIC


Teac AX-20 1975  Teac AN-180  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  TeacAX-20 in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   vTeacAX-20 in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Teac Model 5A Mixer 1975 $1,499.50  Teac Model5A mixer in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac Model5A mixer in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   vTeac Model5A mixer ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Teac Model 2 & MB20 meter bridge 1975  Teac Model 2 mixer with MB-20 Meter Bridge  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac Model 2 mixer with MB-20 Meter Bridge  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   vTeac Model 2 mixer with MB-20 Meter Bridge ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Teac Model 1 1976 - 1978 $150  Teac Model 1 mixer  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection  Teac Model 1 mixer in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection   vTeac Model 1 mixer ad in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Teac RC-71 & Teac RC-401  Remotes  Teac Model 2 mixer with MB-20 Meter Bridge  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection    v


Teac - Home Made with Teac - album produced around the first Teac A-3340

1976 $2.09

  Teac Model 2 mixer with MB-20 Meter Bridge  in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection    v   Teac Home Made album in the Reel2ReelTexas.com vintage reel tape recorder recording collection


Here's some good information from a repair facility about Teac/Tascam

Teac/Tascam tape deck summary

Here’s the summary on Teac and Tascam reel to reel tape decks, based on servicing these decks for the last 40+ years. To start with, Wikipedia has a good summary of the origins of Teac and Tascam. This writeup will concentrate on Teac, the consumer/stereo division, and Tascam, the recording studio/Pro audio division of reel to reels.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TEAC_Corporation

and a secondary write-up, with additional information:

https://www.teac-audio.eu/en/teac-the-history-of-recording-and-sound-part-1-128622.html

 (for the record, I have never seen a Teac TD-102)

The earliest Teac deck I’ve seen is a 7” stereo tube Concertone made by Teac, and then when Teac became popular in the US in the late 1960s, I’ve serviced a ton of the 4010/6010/7010 models and beyond.

  Teac was an early adopter of the three motor transport design, meaning that the reel motors were direct drive (with a couple of exceptions), and the transports were therefore relatively simple and reliable. The capstan motor drive, by and large, was belt drive, again, with a few exceptions.

Teac – Consumer division

It’s a tough call on who sold the most consumer tape decks, Sony, Akai or Teac, as I see about equal amounts of them in for service and for sale. Generally speaking, with the exception of some of the early decks, Teacs have withstood the test of time, and have some common, easily repaired faults covered in the ‘pros and cons’ section below.

As technology progressed, a number of the higher end Teac decks had built in dbx noise reduction, which improved the signal to noise ratio by about 30-35db.  This is a big improvement over the 10db provided by a Dolby B noise reduction system. The only catch is that if you record a tape encoded with dbx, then you need to play it back with a dbx decoder. The dbx noise reduction system is based on a compression/expansion principle, and the tapes will sound awful if played back without the proper decoding.

Teac made both single direction and auto reverse reel to reels, the auto reverse function using the standard foil strips at each end of the tape to trigger the reverse function. A number of decks provided a dual direction playback, while only recording in the forward direction. This reduced the tape head count from 6 to 4, resulting in significant cost savings.

From the links above, the last consumer reel to reel machine that Teac made was the X2000 in 1983. That deck came in single and dual direction models, and was available in silver and black. Substantially less models were made in ½ track high speed mode, similar to a Revox B77, called the X2000M. The X2000 had built in dbx noise reduction, and are a good sounding and collectible machine. From what I gather online, the X2000 was made until about 1986 or so.

Apparently there were two versions of the X2000, the one with the standard Teac steel heads, and a different version with the longer life ferrite heads.

Tascam

Tascam is the pro/music division of Teac, and while several models were branded under both the Teac and Tascam name, Tascam did a big push towards recording studios, both small and large.  They were very successful in making multitrack machines up to 1” 16 track models. Many smaller studios that couldn’t afford 2” machines would use these Tascam multitracks extensively, with excellent results.

 Teac A-3340

I believe that Tascam was first to market with the A-3340 ¼” 4 track multitracking 10” machine, and many were sold starting around 1972. The previous links show an earlier Teac 4 track machine, but not many were sold. Our high school purchased one in 1976, and us high school students bashed it around without it ever failing. In 1975, Tascam brought out the 80-8, a ½” 8 track model, which was also very popular with small studios. The slight downside of both models is that they used an AC synchronous motor that could not be pitch controlled, so sales drooped a bit when Otari and Fostex introduced decks that offered pitch control available. Teac did come out with a DC motor retrofit for the 80-8, which consisted of changing the AC motor out to a DC one, and snaking a wire out the back to a small power supply/pitch control box. While some were sold, Tascam quickly brought out the 3440 and the Model 38.  These units were the 4 and 8 channel improved versions of the older  multitracks, that had pitch control built right into the decks.

Tascam quickly expanded into many different multitrack models, right up to 1” 16 track, in ‘portable’ (insert roll eyes here) and console/rolllaround models. Many of these were studio standards for years, and many hit records and demos were recorded on them. As the competition grew between manufacturers, Tascam did cut some corners. When you consider that the original 80-8 8 track weighed close to 90 lbs, whereas the later model 38 only weighed about 55 lbs, there’s a lot of metal that was replaced with plastic, including things like the head cover and front panels. For the most part, this didn’t affect the reliability of these decks overall, however the flip-up plastic head cover on various models broke easily, and are now missing on decks available for resale.

The last Tascam machine manufactured was the 2 channel BR-20T, which was made right to 2004. It was a silent, bulletproof machine, with a retail price of $4,000.

Teac/Tascam Pros and Cons…

While there are certain problems found only in Tascam machines, the strengths and weak points generally are the same between the two company divisions, so we’re only making one list.

PROS

Overall, the Teac and Tascam machines have held up very well over time, and are a great value and purchase nowadays. As with any tape deck, the head condition is paramount, and since almost all models had steel heads, they did wear, especially on the pro decks that were used on a daily basis. The ferrite heads used in some of the X2000 models showed wear a lot less slowly, and are a more desirable version for this reason.

Amazingly, Teac/Tascam does still support and supply parts for reel to reel decks. While some parts (certain head types) are now discontinued and out of stock, you can still buy many parts from Teac. This is obviously a big plus over other manufacturers.

While the frequency response isn’t exactly flat out of any Teac or Tascam machine (many have a 3db bump in the bass response around 40-80Hz,  which is typical of many Japanese brands of decks), this provides a bit of a punch, making bass drums sound bigger than they really are. Some of the Tascam decks have an internal trimpot to compensate for this slight bass boost, resulting in a flatter frequency response.

Generally speaking, Teac/Tascam machines are reliable, with some of the common problems listed in the ‘cons’ section below. Assuming that the heads are in good shape, and a competent tech has serviced the machine, Teacs and Tascams are a good bet for a long term purchase. With many machines having been sold, good used replacement parts aren’t hard to find, (aside from things like the fragile head covers), and while expensive, JRF Magnetics in New Jersey can supply new heads.

CONS

Each tape deck manufacturer has their flaws, and here are some of the common problems with Teac and Tascam machines.

Rubber belts and pinch rollers. While only some of the very early Teac machines used idler wheels, the rubber belts are known to disintegrate and go ‘gooey’, turning the rubber belt into a semi liquid mess. Get that stuff on your fingers, and it will be there for three days, no matter how hard you scrub. Luckily most belts are relatively easy to change, either by taking off the front cover, or popping the back off.
Bad belts and pinch rollers are such a common problem with Teacs that we automatically change the belt before even powering up a deck, and here’s why:

Bad motors.  The DC motors that were used in many Teac and Tascam decks are relatively fragile. If you are unfortunate enough to have a gooey belt wrap itself around the motor pulley and seize the motor, the motor will burn out within 10 seconds or so of being stalled. Usually these motors are not repairable, but good used replacements are available on eBay, generally between $150—200 USD.

Bad solder joints. This is a problem found more on Tascam home studio decks, specifically the 32, 34,  and 38, but also can crop up on the higher end 4X and 5X models. Tascam used the common ‘wave soldering’ method, where components and connectors are soldered into place by putting the PC boards into a solder bath, which solders many joints at the same time. While literally all modern electronics uses this production technique, the problem is that the large motherboards used in the Tascam decks bend and flex due to heat buildup, and over time, solder joints will crack and cause intermittent audio. Usually it’s the solder connections between the top and bottom of the boards that go bad, and can be repaired, although there’s typically 100-200 joints that need resoldering for the deck to become reliable.

http://www.technologystudent.com/pcb/wave1.html

Seized lithium grease. This is super common throughout many Teac and Tascam models, especially on decks that have sat in a closet for 20 years. The white lithium grease that lubricates the transport hardens and dries up. This is most common on the pinch roller sleeve bearing, causing the pinch roller not to touch the capstan, and either causing a super fast ‘play’ mode, as the reel motor whips the tape through the machine, or no play at all, if the take-up reel is full. Fortunately the fix is relatively simple, and is outlined elsewhere on the site here.

Bad relays.  Again, more of an issue with Tascam decks, there are somewhere between 1 and 3 relays per channel on the pro decks, which switch the play and record heads in and out of the circuits, etc. Over time, these relay contacts become intermittent, and tapping of the audio board(s) can bring the audio back. Due to the nature of the relay contacts, the relays cannot be sprayed with the DeOxit cleaner, and they need to be replaced for reliable operation. (Note that the identical intermittent audio issues can also be caused by the bad motherboard solder joints as well). While some of these relays have been discontinued, careful internet searches can find suitable replacements.

Reel tables. We’ve seen a few machines come in where the metal casting of the reel table holders to the motor shaft crack and fall apart. While this isn’t common, a Tascam TSR-8 ½” deck had this casting fall apart while the deck was in full speed rewind mode, shooting the tape across the shop. Replacing these is an easy task, but they are sometimes hard to find online.

Noisy transistors. Again, not commonplace, but we’ve had some of the ‘corroded lead’ problems in the preamp transistors on some Teac models (notably the 3340) causing distorted, noisy and intermittent operation.

Bad function switches. This affects only the 7” X series of Teac. The X-3, X-7, etc. We’ve seen the switch contacts burn out that turn the AC motors on and off, resulting typically in no ‘play’ function, or an intermittent play function. Replacement switch banks are available on eBay, however swapping them out is challenging, as a good part of the deck has to come apart to access them.

 


 
 

 

Teac Tascam Part 1 of 3 • Go to Part 2 • Go to Part 3 • Go to Part 4 • Downloads of Teac/Tascam 38 minute video available at this link See also Multi-Track recording

Go to:  AEG/MagnetophonAkaiAltecAmplifier CorpAmpexAmproAstaticAstrocom/MarluxBang & OlufsenBellBell & HowellBell LabsBerlant ConcertoneBeyerdynamicBrüel & KjærBrenellBrushCetec GaussConcordCraigCrown • DenonDokorderDualEdisonEicoElectro SoundElectro VoiceEMI/GramophoneFerrographFostexFreemanGrundigHeathKitITCJVCKLHLeevers RichLyrecMagnecordMarantzMCIMitsubishiNagraNakamichiNeumannNewcombNeveOkiOtariPentronPhilipsPioneerPrestoRadio Shack/RealisticRangertoneRCARobertsRolaSansuiScullyShureSolid State LogicSonySoundcraftSpectoneStancil HoffmanStellavoxStephensStuder ReVoxTandbergTape-AthonTapesonicTeac/TascamTechnicsTelefunkenTolnai ToshibaUher VikingWebster Chicago/WebcorWebster ElectricWestern Electric/AltecWilcox-GayWollensak


The non-profit Museum was dissolved on December 31, 2017. Donations are NOT tax deductible and are now processed by Phantom Productions.

All donations to MOMSR go 100% to support restoration of vintage magnetic recording devices in the private collection and help fund the web site development and hosting.

 

Thank you for viewing our site! We hope you have found our information helpful and interesting. We are committed and passionate about preserving the history of recording.  Every little bit helps us protect and preserve these significant vintage recording devices and information. We offer a seven hour video set about our collection and the history of magnetic recording available at this link. You can purchase the seven hours files via download.

 

 

Tour our collection! 

We offer seven hours of 50 video segments via download about our collection and the history of magnetic recording available at this link.

ORDER THE VIDEO FILES ON LINE - was 14.95  NOW only $9.95

There are 50 QuickTime H264 854 X 480 files in this download.  Play on MAC OS or Windows Media Player

We provide 48 hours during which to download the files. After that the file access will expire.  Once the files are downloaded they are yours to keep.

© 2018 Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording  •  Webmaster • All pictures and content on this web site are the property of the Theophilus family,the Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording and reel2reeltexas.com • Photos of items in our collection are available for sale. We do NOT provide copies of ads, nor photos from other sources! All photo work is billed at studio rates and a deposit is required.